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‘Blackpink: Light Up the Sky’ is a mix of honesty and music

By: Ruth L. Navarra

Jennie Kim tells the camera quietly that she’d rather not talk about herself.  And yet, director Caroline Suh was able to make her share about her childhood and training days in the newest Netflix documentary “Blackpink: Light up the Sky.”

She’s not the only one. Blackpink members Jisoo, Lisa and Rosé allowed Suh and her crew into their lives for a few days to have a glimpse of what it’s like to be one of the most globally successful K-pop girl groups of our time. 

“The four of us have come a long way.  And we will continue to work hard to show more of us to our fans,” said Jisoo during the virtual press conference of the show yesterday. 

Video footage of their trainee days, childhood performances, their dormitory and the way they record songs are also shown.  But there’s also the way they show their relationships with each other and other people.

Relationships with their producer Teddy Park, their pilates instructor, and makeup artist. People who take care of them and whom they consider as friends.  There are also times when they just openly reveal their thoughts.  

In one scene, we see Rosé on her own, strumming her guitar, fiddling with her piano and singing. 

“I have a really hard time falling asleep.  I have a lot of thoughts running through my head.  Singing is like stress relief and everything just makes sense when I am doing this,” she said in the documentary.  She then shared what she misses most about her trainee days.  

The documentary is spoken in three languages, too.  Korean, English and Thai.  

“At first it was a little bit awkward. We were not familiar with having cameras all around us 24/7. But I think we got comfortable and later on, we forget that there was a camera or filming us and we will start getting more playful,” she said at the press conference.

“Blackpink: Light up the sky” is now streaming on Netflix.

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